• guide to shopping in mysore

Your Mysore Shopping Guide

In Mysore you have shopping options GALORE. Mysore might be royal and known for yoga, but many people come here just to shop. Famous Mysore silk is found here with sari prices starting at 12,000 rupees up to over a Lakh!.  Khadi cotton is sold almost everywhere and I myself stocked up on about 9 meters of amazing cotton.

Read More: Shopping In India, What to Buy WHERE

 Your Mysore Shopping Guide

Unlike Goa where most things are brought in and sold by random shop owners, Mysore has that old fashion feel and you’re getting things straight from the source.

As I mentioned in my Artisan in Mysore post, you can help make your own incense and oils, watch the wood workers make Inlay, and watch the sculptors work.

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Khaddi Cotton

You can get Khaddi all over Karnataka which is known for it and they sell it in many shops in the city center of Mysore. If you’re able to go out while touring in Melukote and see the women make it, it’s so worth it and you’ll get a better price then Mysore.

While the silk factory was all done my machines with people doing minor details, the khaddi I bought was done the old fashioned way with women doing the work by hand with non-automated machines. I’ve have a post coming soon about how to get khaddi and how to get clothing made in India.

Read More: How to Ship Souvenirs Home From India

khaddi cotton shopping in mysore

Mysore Silk

If you want silk or cotton you can go straight to the factories like I did (although if there are travel bloggers/candle making/masseuse’s out there that can afford Mysore silk I want to know how!).

Go straight to the only Mysore Silk factory and see how it’s made. It’s really incredible to watch the silk start from a bundle and the many many steps it goes through until it’s finally weaved into a sari. They use real gold on the borders and the saris are incredibly expensive. No one has been able to duplicate the famous Mysore silk although they try, so therefore you can’t take photos inside. If you’re dying for some silk, you might be able to afford the cheapest option of a square scarf for 1000 rs. You can buy plain colors by the meter at 1400 rs per meter. Actually a great deal considering the quality of the silk.

Sandalwood & more

The only shop you can buy the famous Mysore Sandalwood at is Cauvery Emporium which is government owned and pricey. Here though at least you’ll know everything is real. I picked up Ben’s souvenir here (a Channapatna toy monkey from the famous Channapatna region near Bangalore) and a couple wooden bangles made by them as well, which are hand-painted with bright pastel colors.

mysore art incense makingAs for buying coffee beans, wait until you are in Coorg where it comes from and you can pick up some Kodova wine while you’re at it. If you want imported things from Jaipur (who doesn’t?) you can pick them up at Green Hotel or wait and get them way cheaper in Jaipur…

For all the little bits and bops head to Devaraja market (the main bazaar) PS did you know bazaar is a Hindi word?

Devaraja Market

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping GuideYou can walk through all the fruit, veggies, and flower markets because it’s actually a very unique market in that it’s clean and insanely well organized. I learned that the most expensive banana called nanjagud rasa bale, which comes from Nanjagud, is black even on the tree and has anti-carcinogenic properties.

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping GuideYou can pick up old framed photos of the Gods or old postcards that have been recycled and painted on. I picked up a few fake gold bangles and the guy had a ball of a time trying to fit the tiny ones on my hands. I thought I had small hands, but in India they are giant. Whey are Indian girls’ hands so small!? Just like a ring size is measured in the U.S., here they measure your wrist.

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping GuideDefinitely pick up your incense, essential oils and perfumes here. If you buy a 8 ml oil bottle of lavender or some scent you like (I love the Indian lotus) you can add a little alcohol to another bottle at home and put a couple drops in making it a perfume which lasts a long time.

Mysore Shopping Guide

Mysore Shopping GuideYou’ll have to try the sweets. I sadly hate Indian sweets. After all this time and trying so many the only thing I like is peanut jaggery (unsaturated sugar). You can sample pure jaggery here and taste it with rice puffs which wasn’t bad. You can try famous Mysore pak (a sweet made from sugar, ghee, and flour) with some almond milk and the most famous shop Guru Sweets just outside the market.

Mysore Shopping Guide

 

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2016-11-08T17:14:09+00:00

About the Author:

Rachel Jones left a career in nursing and lived on the beaches of Goa, India for the five years. Now she lives in Mexico where she gives advice on the 40+ countries she’s visited in the last 10 years. She’s the author of two India travel e-books: Guide to India and Insider’s Guide to Goa. Her blog, Werkenntwen, like its name, is a contradiction combining off-beat adventurous places with glamorous and bespoke travel. Werkenntwen has been featured in ELLE, Marie Claire, Grazia, and Cosmopolitan magazines. She’s a writer for Bravo TV.

18 Comments

  1. venus john December 16, 2014 at 7:34 pm - Reply

    thanks for all the information especially about mysore silk and the price and about original mysore sandal wood.

  2. Renuka December 16, 2014 at 9:26 pm - Reply

    So cool and vibrant photos! I am in Bangalore at the moment. Maybe I can take a short trip to Mysore and explore everything that you mentioned here!

  3. Jessica December 16, 2014 at 10:23 pm - Reply

    I love all of your photos. Mysore looks like a really neat place. I need to get over to India!!

  4. Christine @thetraveloguer December 16, 2014 at 10:53 pm - Reply

    That looks like the best market ever!! love the photos. How come the Mysore silk is so expensive?

    • Rachel Jones December 19, 2014 at 7:34 pm - Reply

      Apparently the way they spin it is different than anywhere in the world and is top secret

    • Rachel Jones December 19, 2014 at 7:34 pm - Reply

      OH and it’s got real gold for the gold bits!

  5. Justine December 17, 2014 at 10:31 am - Reply

    The Devaraja Market looks amazing. I love exploring markets when I travel. It’s one of my favorite activities. But I have NEVER seen a market look anywhere near that organized. I’m used to everything being strewn about and there’s always muck on the floors. Seriously, your photos make me laugh because everything is put in such precise piles. It’s like they arranged everything perfectly to be photographed!

    • Rachel Jones December 19, 2014 at 7:32 pm - Reply

      omgsh it’s insane how pretty everything was organized- has NOTHING on this market!

  6. Danni @Leftnleavin December 17, 2014 at 11:56 pm - Reply

    Fab photos, especially the colors of the pigments.
    When I make it to India one day I fully intend on buying fabric and getting some clothes made at the tailors. My mum used design her own stuff and get it made for so cheap in India and Pakistan when we were growing up.
    I would definitely get some jasmine oil but someone once told me that a lot of Indian ladies of the night use jasmine? Is that true?

    • Rachel Jones December 19, 2014 at 7:30 pm - Reply

      I haven’t heard that about Jasmine, now I’m curious too and will ask.

  7. Tim | UrbanDuniya December 19, 2014 at 4:53 pm - Reply

    Devaraja Market is great – so much to be found here, and in the streets around it. Great guide – I love how comprehensively you cover India :)

  8. Avani Bhamidipati April 29, 2015 at 12:24 am - Reply

    Hi Rachel!
    So I was born and brought up in Mysore and have been living away from my little town for the last 11 years! Living in Australia & now the America, There is not a day that I miss my parents and my hometown!
    All of your photos and descriptions overwhelmed me! I remember going to Deveraja Urs market with my father to buy flowers, banana leaves, Fresh turmeric, Beetle leaves, Glass bangles and everything else for festivities all year round! My city looks like a new bride every time I visit! I am visiting Mysore again in a few days and cannot contain my excitement. Reading your blog made me realize how I missed all the little details I have not captured since my childhood. I had forgotten the colors in my city, how beautiful it looks with change in every hour. I remember going up the Chamundi Hill at 6.45pm and waiting for the lights to turn on the Mysore Palace and taking it the breathtaking views!
    I have some tips for when you visit again, Hopefully you will!
    You must make sure you visit Mysore around Dasara festival. To me its the most beautiful then.
    You must visit Manasagangothri Campus and look around the other buildings which are now part of the university but they belonged to the Royal family.
    Go up the Chamundi Hill when you can!
    Eat the best Dosas in the world! @ Mylari Restaurant
    Catch the best Mayonnaise filled most yummy Chicken Burgers at Downtown Burgers!
    My gosh, I can go on and on! But interestingly I am visiting Goa with my family mid May and would love your input on places to see, things to do, food to eat for my trip!
    Thank you again for this wonderful recap of my beautiful bride- Mysore City!

    • Rachel Jones April 29, 2015 at 6:17 pm - Reply

      I’m glad you liked the recap!! Hope you can come back soon.

  9. […] shopping in Mysore is incredible here and they are known for their local inlay artisans and silks. Mysore is also the […]

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